Cooking’s Effect on Food

May 19, 2011

 

When you cook any food you are changing its molecular structure.  You see it happen in your frying pan A piece of meat becomes more firm, a carrot gets soft, a potato gels and a tomato turns into a sauce.  What’s happening is the cellular structure is breaking down and forming different bonds.  This means the nutrient value is changing, and in most cases the its is decreasing.
Below are the results of a 2003 study from the USDA which tested the effects of cooking on nutrient levels in a variety of food.  The overall finding was that any heat exposure will break down and reduce the amount of nutrients available in the food.  The higher the heat or longer the exposure the greater the loss.  Each number represents the overall nutrient loss of food being “baked” which is basically how dry kibble is produced.  Keep in mind that canned food is exposed to more heat and will high greater nutrient losses.

 

 

effects of cooking on food

 

When kibble is cooked it is exposed to multiple levels of heat.  First it is put under extreme pressure and high heat from steam when it is extruded.  The final round in its actual “cooking” phase where it goes through dryers and is typically baked at 350F.  Therefore the numbers found in the 2003 study may be higher then what is truly available in kibble.

The Cost of Cooking

Many pet owners feel raw pet food is too expensive.  However, as we have illustrated, cooked food does not give you the same bang for your buck.  If you increase the price of canned or kibble 25-50% to account for the loss in nutrient value, you will see that raw is competitively priced.

 

 

QUICK FACTS – Raw vs. Cooked Kibble

Kibble can have fillers and non-digestible ingredients that tax the pet’s organs.

Kibble absorbs water which can contribute to dehydration and diarrhea and eventually kidney disease.dog food education

Kibble causes teeth decay and gum disease.  75-85% of domesticated cats and dogs suffer from periodontal disease at a level requiring treatment by 3 years of age.

Cooking  = Up to 50% Less Nutrients

Kibble can have fillers and non-digestible ingredients that tax the pet’s organs.

Kibble absorbs water which can contribute to dehydration and diarrhea and eventually kidney disease.

Kibble causes teeth decay and gum disease.  75-85% of domesticated cats and dogs suffer from periodontal disease at a level requiring treatment by 3 years of age.

Cooking  = Up to 50% Less Nutrients

 

 
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The FDA’s Salmonella Scare

November 2, 2010

The raw pet food industry is regulated by the FDA.  This is because pet food is considered to be a ready-to-serve product where the chicken you buy from your butcher is not.  Recently the FDA feels that regulations on the raw pet food industry needs to be changed and that “certain criteria should be considered in recommending enforcement action against animal feed”.  In other words they want to do more testing on pet food and determine if they should reject food with very minute amounts of bacteria.

Here’s the problem; bacteria is good for your pet.  Their natural diet is to eat dead carcass meat.  Their intestinal tract needs this bacteria to be strong so that it can fight of more harmful bacteria. If you feed raw, you know this.

Last month the FDA put out a notice saying that it is accepting feedback from consumers, manufactures, retailers, veterinarians and anyone else with an opinion on this subject.  This comment period was to end soon, but because of the gravity of this kind of decision they have extended the commenting period.  This extension was announced shortly after the release stating the FDA will be doing random tests on pet food in 2011.

It is so important that everyone from consumers to animal health exporters weigh in on this issue.  We know bacteria is a good thing in limited amounts.  Therefore we are very clean in our production and careful in where we buy our ingredients.  We go to extreme measures to ensure that even when the product leaves our plant is is kept at below 0 temperatures to maintain it’s safety.  If the FDA starts rejecting food with any level of bacteria then they will be choking the raw industry and you may have to start buying your raw pet food from a bootlegger.

Please submit your comments to the FDA and to us.

Docket Folder at regulations.gov – go here to find out more about this issue.

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To HPP or to not HPP

October 22, 2010

Several raw producers have chosen to pasteurize or pressure sterilize their meat material to be sold as frozen raw diets.  Most raw pet food manufacturers are doing this to minimize their risk of a recall. The problem is that the jury is still out on the impact that HPP has on the food.

Raw products have been on the market for many years now and have done extremely well at improving pet health without causing any problems.  We do not think pressure sterilizing the product will improve the raw diet in any way.  As a matter of fact, we believe that any additional processes that do not improve the nutritional value of the food are a waste of time and money. HPP has shown that it will kill bad

HPP has shown that it will kill bad bacteria, but that is at the expense of the good bacteria. If the raw material is sterilized it will become a Petri dish for growing bad bacteria.  The best way to avoid recalls is to use the highest quality meat material and produce in a clean environment.  You

Another issue with HPP is that you can buy a lower quality meat since you have the confidence that the HPP processes will eliminate bacteria. The best way to avoid recalls is to use the highest quality meat material and produce in a clean environment.  You

At this time, we do not use HPP and will stand against adding un-needed processes that will only increase the cost of the food. We will buy the highest quality meat material and produce in a clean environment using strict food handling procedures.  With trusted ingredient sources and distributors to ensure that what you are taking home is safe for your pet.

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Hermit Crabs & Bull Dicks

October 15, 2010

Bully stickWe just got back from Chicago attending the Backer Christmas Show.  As usual all kinds of products were available.  The booth next to us “Free Range Dog Bones” had all kinds of bull parts including the one most precious to the bull. Yes we are taking about Bull Dicks in Chicago and we are not referring to Irish cops.  Bull sticks or pizzels, as some refer to them, are a big hit as a chew stick this year.  Also for sale was the entire face of the bull sans eyes.  The whole snout and jowls was intact and available as a chew.  These things can be up to 3 or 4 feet wide.  I think it might be a bit scary lying on your living room rug.  As for the pizzels you might want to put them away when prudish Aunt Millie comes over.

One booth that really got my attention was selling Hermit crabs.  If you have never seen a hermit crab they are like a very small doorknob with insect legs that propel them hermit crab foot ball helmetaround.  This guy had a large (about 4’ by 8’) white surface with a 2 inch sides.  The crabs were all painted like NFL football helmets or other types of logos. It was very pretty from a distance.  As I got up close and saw the insect propulsion system, it kind of creeped me out.  I don’t think they would make much of a pet.  I certainly would not want a bunch of them sleeping on my bed. Maybe you could get the ones painted with NFL helmets to organize into teams and have a game. I am going to skip the tailgate party on that one.

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Dog Park Social Structure

October 10, 2010
Author: Gary Burselljumping dog

I am a regular at the dog park and enjoy it almost as much as our dog Bailey.  Dogs are one of the most social species, and a dog park is like Disneyland for them.

At about 9:30 each day Bailey becomes agitated.  He will wonder the office and play with toys until eventually he starts poking me in the butt with the leash.  I grab the keys and he instantly knows it is time to meet old and new friends for an uncontrolled hour of canine bliss.  As soon as we get to the park all the dogs greet each other at the gate with a social grace and excitement that makes us humans look like reclusive introverts with no since of kindness.  For a dog it does not matter the size, color or stature, they are just so dammed glad to see each other.  Bailey is a rescued Greyhound Husky mix so he is tall and fast but loves to play with the little ones.  His best buddy at the park is Sammy a Jack Russell/Dauksen who is small and fast.  It is like Mutt & Jeff only dogs.  Bailey does not care if you are fat and slobber, skinny and yippy he just wants to play. All the dogs enjoy each others company.  So why can’t people be like that.  So often I forget to shake hands or give hugs.  A dog would never forget the proper greeting when a friend enters the room.

Share your story about your dog park experiences or just tell us about your favorite dog park and you will be entered to win a free bag of freeze dry food.  Simply leave a comment below and you could be picked to be a random winner!

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